About the Community of Readers

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Established in 2007 by the Leatherby Libraries, the Community of Readers is the summer reading program for Chapman University. This program is open to everyone who has borrowing privileges at the Leatherby Libraries and a current library account, including students, faculty, staff, and alumni. Members select books from the Leatherby Libraries and receive prizes upon submission of their first review. The only requirement is that books must be obtained through the Leatherby Libraries.

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Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Circe

TitleCirce
AuthorMadeline Miller
Call NumberMCNAUGHTONS  
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewThis mythology story is not my usual cup of tea, but it was a fun cross-country flight read. It did make me want to delve a little deeper into the myths. Also, how do you pronounce her name? Is it Sirk, or Serse, or Sersa?
Submitted ByRobyne Kelly
Department or MajorFood Science
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailrokelly@chapman.edu

The Year of Magical Thinking

TitleThe Year of Magical Thinking
AuthorJoan Didion
Call NumberPS3554.I33 Z63 2005
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewI love Joan Didion. I would read lab reports, if she wrote them. Her writing is magical to me. But this book was tough one, about the loss of both her husband and daughter. I always root for Joan, but this book highlights the fact that neither wealth nor talent can shield you from these losses.
Submitted ByRobyne Kelly
Department or MajorFood Science
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailrokelly@chapman.edu

Don't Believe Everything You Think

TitleDon't Believe Everything You Think
AuthorThomas Kida
Call NumberBF441 .K45 2006
Location2nd Floor Social Sciences
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewFor a book about errors in thinking and judgment, this book is a surprisingly easy and entertaining read. More importantly, this book helps you develop the ability to recognize common errors in judgement, from relying on faulty memories to preferring stories to statistics.
Submitted ByTaylor Greene
Department or MajorLibrary
StatusStaff
Chapman EmailTgreene@chapman.edu

Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Fire and Fury Inside the Trump White House

TitleFire and Fury Inside the Trump White House
AuthorMichael Wolff
Call Number973.933 W
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingNot Recommended
Book ReviewWow there are lots of finger pointing in this book. All his advisors trying to get a seat next to Trump. I think there are better things to do with your time rather than reading this book.
Submitted ByJames McCulloch
Department or MajorFacilities
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailmcculloc@chapman.edu

Daughter of Fortune

TitleDaughter of Fortune
AuthorIsabel Allende
Call NumberPQ 8098.1. L54 H5513 1999
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewElisa was abandoned and left in a box as a newborn, which a young woman Rose decides to take her in and raise the baby as part of the family. While Chile in the 1800s didn’t believe orphans can ever amount to any high social class, Rose is determined to provide all the education she can for Eliza to grow up and marry into a decent family once she is of age.

I love this book because Rose’s dedication to someone who isn’t family by blood gives the girl a chance for a successful life. Elisa’s education in different subjects and languages was unheard of at the time, which makes the story more intriguing to see how an educated and adopted girl interacts with the society around her.  
Submitted ByCatalina Lopez
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailcalopez@chapman.edu

The Picture of Dorian Gray

TitleThe Picture of Dorian Gray
AuthorOscar Wilde
Call NumberPN 6727. T44 P53 2008
Location1st Floor Graphic Novel
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewThis is an illustrated version of the classic novel by Wilde. Dorian Gray is one of the most wealthy bachelors. When artist Basil Hallward completed a portrait of the young man, Dorian laments on how unfair it is that he will age and his portrait will remain ever young. He wishes to stay young forever, which to his surprise it comes true. Dorian continues to live young but his portrait ages over time and illustrates the true horror of Dorian’s sins.
Submitted ByCatalina Lopez
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailcalopez@chapman.edu

Cinder


TitleCinder
AuthorMarissa Meyer
Call NumberPS3613.E9747 C56 2012
Location3rd Floor Muth
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewA wonderful twist on the classical tale of Cinderella. In which Cinder is a sassy cyborg with feminist undertones and simply entices you to read page after page. It is a great read with sudden twists in the plot that you almost don't see coming.
Submitted ByAisha K. Cornejo
Department or MajorPsychology/Philosophy
StatusStudent
Chapman Emailcorne129@mail.chapman.edu

Trickster: Native American Tales, A Graphic Collection

TitleTrickster: Native American Tales, A Graphic Collection
AuthorVarious Authors
Call NumberE98.F6 T73 2010  
Location1st Floor Graphic Novel
RatingSomewhat Recommended
Book ReviewThis story collection tells different tales of Tricksters, mischievous critters who instigate important occurrences according to Native American legend. Each tale includes a moral as well as an explanation of why certain things are as they are. For example, one tale explains why rabbits have small, puffy tails. Each story is by a different author and artist, so keep flipping through if you read one that you aren't too fond of since they are all different styles.
Submitted ByMargaret Puentes
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailmpuentes@chapman.edu

Monday, August 20, 2018

We Should All Be Feminists

TitleWe Should All Be Feminists
AuthorChimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Call NumberHQ1815.5 .A653 2015
Location2nd Floor Social Sciences
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewThis short book is an expansion of Adichie’s TED Talk of the same name and serves as a good primer for anyone interested in an introduction to feminism, especially from a non-Western perspective (though Adichie is familiar with Western feminist “classics” and even talks about criticism she received for her ideas being too “Western”). Adichie discusses the ways in which anti-feminist thinking hurts both women and men, backed up by real-life anecdotes experienced by colleagues, friends, and herself in Nigeria and the United States. She also provides specific examples of ways that people can raise their children (both male and female) to counteract ingrained sexism in the culture.
Submitted ByKristin Laughtin-Dunker
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emaillaughtin@chapman.edu

Death : the high cost of living

TitleDeath : the high cost of living
AuthorGaiman, Neil
Call NumberPN6728.D357 G35 1994
Location1st Floor Graphic Novel
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewI don't know if it's right to call a book about death a sweet story, but that's the feeling I came away with.  The character of death was quirky and adorable.  The plot was clever and I liked the ending (rare for me!).  Don't let the title (or the author) make you think it's too dark.
Submitted ByRobin Pendergraft
Department or MajorSCST
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailpendergr@chapman.edu

This One Summer

TitleThis One Summer
AuthorJillian Tamaki and Mariko Tamaki
Call NumberPN6727.T26 T55 2014
Location1st Floor Graphic Novel
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewThis is a very subdued and somewhat melancholy graphic novel about Rose, a preteen girl whose family always vacations at a lakeside cottage in Canada, where she meets up every summer with her friend Windy. This summer, though, things are different. Rose is paying more attention to her changing body, sex, and boys (which are still gross to Windy, who is a year-and-a-half younger). Rose’s parents are fighting and her mom is withdrawn due to an event that had happened the previous year. And both Rose and Windy become intrigued by another dramatic event involving the clerk at the general store avoiding his pregnant girlfriend. This book captures that pivotal time of almost-adolescence where one starts to notice the emotional lives of their elders, and is still halfway between forming one’s own opinions and just parroting what one hears while being confused by all of it. It’s a slow-moving story that captures the feeling of summer, while also being so brief a snippet of these characters’ lives that the reader doesn’t see dramatic character growth yet, just the seeds being planted.
Submitted ByKristin Laughtin-Dunker
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emaillaughtin@chapman.edu

Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America

TitleTears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America
AuthorMichael Eric Dyson
Call NumberLeatherby On Order
LocationOther
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewThis book invites white America to evolve. From the NY Times: "Dyson is all too familiar with the claims of innocence and the kneejerk defensiveness that will surely greet this book, and yet he sets out to conquer such denial not only with the difficult truth but also, astonishingly, with love. 'Beloved,' he writes, in the voice of one ministering to the sick, 'your white innocence is a burden to you, a burden to the nation, a burden to our progress. It is time to let it go, to let it die in the place of the black bodies it wills into nonbeing.'" (see nytimes.com/2017/01/12/books/review/tears-we-cannot-stop-michael-eric-dyson.html)

Run, do not walk, to devour this book--by far the most important words I read all summer, and a text I will continue to reference and live by for the rest of my days.
Submitted ByErin Rivero
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailerivero@chapman.edu

Batman : the long Halloween

TitleBatman : the long Halloween
AuthorJeph Loeb and Tim Sale
Call NumberPN6728.B36 L647 1998
Location1st Floor Graphic Novel
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewThis title was recently donated to the library, and it had been almost 20 years since I'd last read it, so I picked it up again.

and I am thrilled that I did. This book is incredible, and perhaps the best Batman story ever written, a  murder mystery that includes just about every one of the Batman's villains, and spanning an entire year.

The story is beautiful, a complex and winding noir classic. But the art is what really elevates the book. Loeb and Sale have worked together and just about every iconic superhero ever and with great results, but this is their thesis statement.

This book achieves what most sequential art aspires to: tells a complete and engaging story using both the story and writing to form a whole greater than the sum of its parts.
Submitted ByCotton Coslett
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailcoslett@chapman.edu