Friday, August 18, 2017

Music, Sound and Silence in Buffy the Vampire Slayer

TitleMusic, Sound and Silence in Buffy the Vampire Slayer
AuthorMultiple Authors
Call NumberML2080. M85 2010
Location3rd Floor Music
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewI am a huge fan of the Buffy the Vampire Slayer series.  This book was super interesting to peruse through and learn why and how a lot of the different songs were used for different episodes, the opening, etc. I also loved reading about one of my all time favorite episodes - Hush - and how much you learn from an episode almost entirely silent. Once More with Feeling was the musical episode that was a huge hit and I loved seeing how that came about.  Great book for any Buffy fans!
Submitted ByJami McCoy
Department or MajorAdvancement
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailjmccoy@chapman.edu

Rules of Civility

TitleRules of Civility
AuthorAmor Towles
Call NumberPS3620.0945R85 2011
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewI enjoyed reading a period story set in New York in the late 30s about life then and how women were judged on everything. This story surrounded two young single working women not immediately interested in attaching themselves to husbands, their trials, and realizing the fondness of those days of singleness.
Submitted ByAnnalisa Goode
Department or MajorLaw
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailagoode@chapman.edu

Lab Girl

TitleLab Girl
AuthorHope Jahren
Call NumberMCNAUGHTON
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewWhile I'm normally not interested in science writing, I decided to check this book out. Jahren holds a PhD in plant physiology with a research emphasis on trees, but also writes poems. This became apparent in her beautiful writing. She masterfully wove the science of trees & their growth with her own personal & professional growth. Magical!
Submitted ByRobyne Kelly
Department or MajorFood Science/ SCST
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailrokelly@chapman.edu

The Year of Magical Thinking

TitleThe Year of Magical Thinking
AuthorJoan Didion
Call NumberPS3554.I33 Z63 2005  
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewDidion tackles the death of her husband of nearly 40 years and the ensuing grief. This is obviously not a breezy read, but anyone who's lost a significant person in their life will feel the familiar weight Didion describes.
Submitted ByRobyne Kelly
Department or MajorFood Science/ SCST
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailrokelly@chapman.edu

Flourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness & Well-being

TitleFlourish: A Visionary New Understanding of Happiness & Well-being
AuthorMartin Seligman
Call NumberBF204.6 .S45 2011  
Location2nd Floor Social Sciences
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewSeligman, the "Father of Positive Psychology", began his research looking at, & talking about happiness. Many years into his research, he's realized that this is a difficult concept to pin down. Instead, he is now makes an argument for flourishing instead. This book is a little more "pop psychology" than his other books, but Seligman is a serious & well-respected researcher. Take advantage of his practical advice.
Submitted ByRobyne Kelly
Department or MajorFood Science/ SCST
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailrokelly@chapman.edu

Gilead

TitleGilead
AuthorMarilynne Robinson
Call NumberPS3568.O3125 G55 2004
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingSomewhat Recommended
Book ReviewI really hoped to like this book more. It was on some "Read before you die" lists, so I checked it out. This story, framed as a letter a man is writing for his son; was beautifully crafted. the sentences were gorgeous. The concepts were universal. But for me, it read just like watching paint dry.
Submitted ByRobyne Kelly
Department or MajorFood Science/ SCST
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailrokelly@chapman.edu

Small data : the tiny clues that uncover huge trends

TitleSmall data : the tiny clues that uncover huge trends
AuthorMartin Lindstrom
Call NumberHF5415.32 .L5576 2016  
Location3rd Floor Business and Economics
RatingNot Recommended
Book ReviewThis may be the worst book I’ve ever read. The premise sounds very promising; using ethnographic approaches to discovering the needs of communities and using that info to shape business strategies. As it turns out, the author has missed an important principle about doing ethnographic research: stereotyping and essentialism must be absolutely avoided. Instead, the author details his method of spending some short amount of time with a small segment of a population, picking up on whatever meaningless details happen to capture his attention, and then creating ideas that supposedly reflect all of the people of that cultural group. It’s an offensive and misguided strategy. Furthermore, as a librarian I can’t abide his reliance on non-scholarly sources in the few instances when he bothered to read existing literature at all. For instance, he seems to put a lot of weight on an article published on a blog that showed what emojis are most used in different countries. According to this author, the fact that people in Saudi Arabia often use water or plant-based emojis somehow ties into a fear of fire and a desire for water. So yeah, it’s not a good book.
Submitted ByTaylor Greene
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailtgreene@chapman.edu

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

The Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories

TitleThe Harlequin Tea Set and Other Stories
AuthorAgatha Christie
Call NumberPR6005.H66 H341
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewI love pretty much anything that Agatha Christie has written.  This book of short stories was no exception.  She can make characters come to life, even in the span of a few pages.  I was able to read all of her "and other stories" books on a road trip last week.  I chose to review that particular one because of the "food" in the title ;), but any one of them is worth picking up as an intro to Ms. Christie (or if you haven't read her short stories).
Submitted ByRobin Pendergraft
Department or MajorSCST
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailpendergr@chapman.edu

A Place Where Sunflowers Grow

TitleA Place Where Sunflowers Grow
AuthorAmy Lee-Tai
Call NumberPS 3612 .E3489P53
LocationMuth
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewA heart felt story about what the parents and the children did in the Japanese internment camps.
Submitted ByJames McCulloch
Department or MajorFacilities Management
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailmcculloc@chapman.edu

The Jungle

TitleThe Jungle
AuthorUpton Sinclair
Call NumberOS3537.185 J85 2010
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewWhen this book was written, immigrants had little hope of achieving the American dream. They worked long hours for little pay. Not only does the author paint a disgusting picture of the meat industry but he also shows the utter corruption of those in power and the reason that many of the poor were attracted to the Socialist movement.
Submitted ByCathy Elliott
Department or MajorLaw Library
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailbias@chapman.edu

Major Pettigrew's Last Stand

TitleMajor Pettigrew's Last Stand
AuthorHelen Simonson
Call NumberPS3619.156294
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewExcellent story of love, tolerance and cultural awareness. Loved the setting in a small English village. Felt like I was a watching Masterpiece Theatre series streaming in my head. Enjoyable read.
Submitted ByAnnalisa Goode
Department or MajorLaw
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailagoode@chapman.edu

A Whole New Mind: Why Right Brainers Will Rule the Future

TitleA Whole New Mind: Why Right Brainers Will Rule the Future
AuthorDaniel Pink
Call NumberBF408.P49
Location2nd Floor Social Sciences
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewI read this book for my current MBA class.  It wouldn't have been something I would pick up normally, but I ended up learning some good life lessons.  A good read if you are thinking about adding some creativity to your life.
Submitted ByRobin Pendergraft
Department or MajorSCST
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailpendergr@chapman.edu

The Artist's Way at Work: Riding the Dragon

TitleThe Artist's Way at Work: Riding the Dragon
AuthorMark Bryan
Call NumberHD53.B79
Location3rd Floor Business and Economics
RatingSomewhat Recommended
Book ReviewI read this book for my latest MBA class.  This one was not nearly as good as the Pink book.  It's about being creative at work, but written in a very "out there" way.  It's good if you are a fan of the zen style, but not my cup of tea.
Submitted ByRobin Pendergraft
Department or MajorSCST
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailpendergr@chapman.edu

John Adams

TitleJohn Adams
AuthorDavid McCullough
Call Numbere 322 .M38 2001 c.2
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewWow! What sacrifices he went through in order that we have the liberties and freedom in this great country of ours.
Submitted ByJames McCulloch
Department or MajorFacilities Management
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailmcculloc@chapman.edu

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Hallelujah Anyway-Rediscovering Mercy

TitleHallelujah Anyway-Rediscovering Mercy
AuthorAnne Laott
Call NumberMc Naughton
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewMercy and forgiveness have the power to transform our lives. The question is, how many of us are willing to extend it to others or even to ourselves. This book makes you remember how the simple act of extending mercy can help to heal our world.
Submitted ByCathy Elliott
Department or MajorLaw Library
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailbias@chapman.edu

Lab Girl

TitleLab Girl
AuthorHope Jahren
Call NumberMcNaughton
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewLab Girl is one of the most fascinating books I’ve read in a long time. On the surface, it is the memoir of soils and plant biologist Hope Jahren, making her way in a male-dominated discipline. But like the world she studies, there are deeper layers in this tale. Jahren weaves intriguing insights into plants – now I know why leaves at the tops of trees are smaller than their pals down below – with her personal journey, which is not an easy one. Like a tenacious tree, she survives.
Submitted ByDawn
Department or MajorSMC
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailbonker@chapman.edu

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

TitleHarry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban
AuthorJ. K. Rowling
Call NumberPR6068 093 H39 1999
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewHarry’s 3rd year at Hogwarts is full of adventure and intrigue. Sirius Black has escaped from the Azkaban and everyone is sure he is out to destroy Harry. But is he? With magic, things are often not what they appear to be.
Submitted ByCathy Elliott
Department or MajorLaw Library
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailbias@chapman.edu

Monday, August 7, 2017

The Picture of Dorian Gray


TitleThe Picture of Dorian Gray
AuthorOscar Wilde
Call NumberPR5819.A2 F73 2011
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewThis was an incredibly enjoyable read that was made even better thanks to the wealth of interesting annotations and illustrations in this "uncensored" edition of Wilde's classic novel. This edition is what Wilde originally submitted to his publisher, which was then toned down for publication. Dorian's homosexuality is less subtext and more overt in this edition, as well as in Basil and Lord Henry's homoerotic obsession with him. I highly recommend this edition for next time anyone wants to read this classic.
Submitted ByDavid Carson
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emaildavcarso@chapman.edu

How schools counter bullying

TitleHow schools counter bullying
AuthorKen Rigby
Call NumberLB3013.34.A8 R54 2010
Location3rd Floor Education
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewThis book is for schools and teachers. I picked it up interested to see if I could read any tips on how to deal with bullying if I saw it in my own dealings. This book lists policies, rules and writings on the bullying situations. It also offers great ways to work with people on how to resolve and prevent bullying. It's written like a textbook but does hold useful information for sure!
Submitted ByJami McCoy
Department or MajorAdvancement
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailjmccoy@chapman.edu

The six-figure woman, and how to be one

TitleThe six-figure woman, and how to be one
AuthorLois Wyse
Call NumberHF5500.2W94 1983
Location3rd Floor Business and Economics
RatingSomewhat Recommended
Book ReviewI have to be honest, I'm checking out the different sections to check off my Reading Challenge from each library. I happen to grab this because of the headline. Unfortunately it's pretty outdated. The other bummer reading this was - not much has changed for women. It does give some good tips though for sure. I'd recommend this as a flip through book rather than reading from cover to cover.
Submitted ByJami McCoy
Department or MajorAdvancement
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailjmccoy@chapman.edu

The Waters of Eternal Youth

TitleThe Waters of Eternal Youth
AuthorDonna Leon
Call NumberMcNaughton
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewThis is the latest in Donna Leon’s Commissario Guido Brunett Mystery series and it does not disappoint. When she was a teenager, Manuela fell into a canal and nearly drowned. She was pulled to safety by a stranger, but not before suffering permanent damage. Now 15 years later, her grandmother asks the Commissario to reinvestigate the incident. Did Manuela fall or was she pushed? Why?? By whom??
Submitted ByCathy Elliott
Department or MajorLaw Library
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailbias@chapman.edu

Friday, August 4, 2017

Summer

TitleSummer
AuthorEdith Wharton
Call NumberPS3545.H16 S86 1998
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewEach year, my book group reads a “100 years ago” book, meaning a book published – surprise! – 100 years ago. This year we chose “Summer” by Edith Wharton. This is one of her two New England tales, set in suffocating small towns. Her two main characters here make peace with that, eventually, in a realistic, if not rosy, way. The character of Charity is fascinating and complicated. She brooks no nonsense and dives into an affair even as she is aware of its potential consequences. Wharton’s frank writing shocked readers of the day, understandably. Do not be fooled by the romantic cover illustrations on most editions. There’s a lot brooding under those frilly frocks.
Submitted ByDawn Bonker
Department or MajorSMC
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailbonker@chapman.edu

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Citizen Hughes

TitleCitizen Hughes
AuthorMichael Drosnin
Location2nd Floor Humanities, CT275.H6678 D74 2004 
RatingSomewhat Recommended
Book ReviewI wanted to know more about Howard Hughes the American Icon, and chose this book because it has reviews of representing the truth throughout.  This was a very tedious read but it really gave a full picture of HH. The book is based upon his own memos and letters written (he rarely used a telephone or spoke to anyone directly) over 30-40 years. All these memos were then stolen in 1974. This book subsequently drew on all these memos (many trunks full), and many of them are featured in the book. I won’t reveal any secrets by saying he was a billionaire who was a profoundly mentally ill recluse and a heavy drug user who tried (sometimes very successfully) to buy many, many politicians, the city of Las Vegas, the state of Nevada and the United States.
Submitted ByLinda Corcoran
Department or MajorAnderson Center
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailgreeley@chapman.edu