Thursday, June 29, 2017

Steve Jobs

TitleSteve Jobs
AuthorWalter Isaacson
Call NumberQA76.2J63I832013
Location3rd Floor Science and Technology
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewThis Book is incredible! I highly recommend. It gives you such a great insight to Steve Jobs and the many influences he had in creative Apple. It also gives you insight into how technology became such a big part of our lives and all the people who made the products we now use today. I love reading about the conflicting reviews that people had about Jobs. You really get a view of the best and worst of Steve Jobs. I have gained a new respect for the technology I use.
Submitted ByMegan Uriarte
Department or MajorAdmission
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailuriarte@chapman.edu

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

The Sweet Science

TitleThe Sweet Science
AuthorA.J. Liebling
Call NumberGV1125 .L5 2004  
Location2nd Floor Social Sciences
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewI recently developed an interest in boxing so I thought I would read this classic in sports nonfiction. Liebling is primarily known as a journalist who covered a wide range of subjects for The New Yorker and wrote the essays in this collection in the 1930s and 1940s. Reading this book gives the reader the tools to appreciate the “sweet science” of boxing and I felt after reading it that I had a much higher awareness of the subtleties of the sport. It also gives an interesting account of an era in boxing history when fights began to be televised, which enthusiasts like Liebling believed caused a decline in the quality of young boxers. Even if you’re not very interested in boxing, this book is enjoyable for its rich description of the people in the boxing world—fighters, coaches, promoters, fans, etc.—and the small details of attending events in New York City in this era.
Submitted ByTaylor Greene
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailtgreene@chapman.edu

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

Back to Full Employment

TitleBack to Full Employment
AuthorRobert Pollin
Call NumberHD5724 .P573 2012  
Location3rd Floor Business and Economics
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewWriting at the end of Barack Obama's first term, Pollin offers a wonderful analysis of the economic problems facing America and details his solution: full employment. Full employment, for Pollin, means reducing all involuntary employment. Through a series of insightful chapters, Pollin is able to help readers understand the importance of a full employment economy. This book is great for those who wish to understand an economic policy rarely talked about in mainstream discussion anymore.
Submitted ByNick D'Andrea
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emaildandrea@chapman.edu

The Girl Before

TitleThe Girl Before
AuthorJP Delaney
Call NumberMcNaughton
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewFirst Emma, then Jane…….Two women whose stories intertwine….. One survives and one is killed….both took up residence at One Folgate St., London…..both became involved with the house’s architect, Edward Monkford…to learn more I suggest you check out this psychological thriller.
Submitted ByCathy Elliott
Department or MajorLaw Library
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailbias@chapman.edu

Monday, June 26, 2017

The Little Prince

TitleThe Little Prince
AuthorJoann Sfar
Call NumberPN 6747 .S48 P4813 2010
Location1st Floor Graphic Novel
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewI've adored the story of The Little Prince since reading the one by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry in high school French class. This graphic novel retelling by Joann Sfar is just as charming! It took me a few panels to get used to the art style--the little prince himself has very wide, football-shaped, disarming eyes--but as I read more, the surrealness of the art really enhanced the dreamy quality of the story.
Submitted ByKristin Laughtin-Dunker
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emaillaughtin@chapman.edu

The Ballet Lover's Companion

TitleThe Ballet Lover's Companion
AuthorZoe Anderson
Call NumberGV1787 .A469 2015
Location2nd Floor Social Sciences
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewThis book is an excellent and modern resource that all ballet lovers will find informative. It provides a good history of the art but also explores modern choreographers and ballets.
Submitted ByLauren Menges
Department or MajorLibrary
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailmenges@chapman.edu

Anne of Green Gables

TitleAnne of Green Gables
AuthorLucy Maud Montgomery
Call NumberPR9199.3.M6 A544 2014
Location3rd Floor Muth
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewAlways a classic, Anne of Green Gables tells the story of the indomitable spirit of Anne Shirley, an orphan girl adopted by a middle-aged brother and sister on Prince Edward Island. This book is timeless and is highly recommended for anyone that wants to be inspired by a fierce and intelligent protagonist.
Submitted ByLauren Menges
Department or MajorLibrary
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailmenges@chapman.edu

This One Summer

TitleThis One Summer
AuthorMariko Tamaki (writer), Jillian Tamaki (illustrator)
Call NumberPN6727.T26 T55 2014
Location1st Floor Graphic Novel
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewThis graphic novel by cousins Mariko and Jilian Tamaki tells the story of a young girl's yearly vacation to a small beach town. While there, she spends most of her time hanging out with her summer friend Windy, watching scary movies, avoiding her parents, and trying to decipher the lives of local teenagers. the book itself is well-written and the illustrations are simple and clean. This book is a great way to remind yourself of the alternating excitement and boredom of being an adolescent on vacation with your parents.
Submitted ByCotton Coslett
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailcoslett@chapman.edu

Friday, June 23, 2017

The world of Christopher Robin : the complete When we were very young and Now we are six

TitleThe world of Christopher Robin : the complete When we were very young and Now we are six
AuthorA. A. Milne ; with decorations and new illustrations in full color by E.H. Shepard
Call NumberPR6025.I65 W675 1958
Location3rd Floor Muth
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewI discovered this book when I was making a research for a paper about the Russian Cartoon version of Winnie the Pooh. If you are familiar with the history of the family, you know that later in his life Christopher Robin tried to live far from the shadow of his portrait in the books of his father. Nevertheless, this book truly express joyful times and contains two volumes: "When we were very young" that contains the world of Christopher Robin when he was three, and "Now we are six" which has more adventures of his childhood, when he passed from 4 to 6 years old. All the poems reflect the love of a caring father and how the little adventures of his boy inspired him to create very wonderful poems.  A new movie is coming that relates a little about their relationship, and if someone is interested in the point of view of Christopher Robin there is a book titled "The enchanted places". It is truly fascinating to explore the life of the author and his son and of course approach to these wonderful books that will take you back to the delightful age of childhood.
Submitted ByAnwar Sosa
Department or MajorMA Film Studies
StatusStudent
Chapman Emailsosac100@mail.chapman.edu

Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood (Persepolis, #1)

TitlePersepolis: The Story of a Childhood (Persepolis, #1)
AuthorMarjane Satrapi
Call NumberPN6747.S245 P4713 2004  
Location1st Floor Graphic Novel
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewDon't be fooled because it is a graphic novel, like "Maus" is a wonderful and touching book that let us to know more about Iran and its history. It is compelling and honest, and we can see an intimate portrait of history trough the eyes of the author. A must-read book, can't wait to read the second part and discover the animated film.
Submitted ByAnwar Sosa
Department or MajorMA Film Studies
StatusStudent
Chapman Emailsosac100@mail.chapman.edu

The Interestings

TitleThe Interestings
AuthorMeg Wollitzer
Call NumberPS3573.O564 I58 2013
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewA story about six friends who meet at summer camp as teens; and what happens to them over the course of many years.This book was on some list of "Best Books of the Year" or the like. I think I expected it to change my life somehow, and it didn't. But it was an easy read, and entertaining. Sometimes, that's enough.
Submitted ByRobyne Kelly
Department or MajorFood Science
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailrokelly@chapman.edu

Homegoing

TitleHomegoing
AuthorYaa Gyasi
Call NumberMCNAUGHTON  
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewA multi-generational tale of two broken branches on a family tree, starting in Africa and ending in the US. Fortunately for me there was a guide in the front of the book that referred to frequently, as keeping the characters straight was sometimes challenging. I always enjoy stories that take me to distant lands and show me lives lived differently from my own.
Submitted ByRobyne Kelly
Department or MajorFood Science
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailrokelly@chapman.edu

All the Light We Cannot See

TitleAll the Light We Cannot See
AuthorAnthony Doerr
Call NumberPS3604.O34 A77 2014
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewTwo lives unexpectedly converge in a story about living through World War II. Doerr is masterful in his descriptions; allowing the reader to see, hear, feel & taste along with his characters. This was a story I carried around in my head for days after reading it.
Submitted ByRobyne Kelly
Department or MajorFood Science
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailrokelly@chapman.edu

Tuesday, June 20, 2017

Modern Romance

TitleModern Romance
AuthorAziz Ansari
Call NumberMcNaughton
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewThis book explores dating and relationships in today's digital world. Ansari, a standup comedian known for his role in Parks and Rec, and a sociologist conduct travel to various cities around the world to investigate different cultural views on issues such as monogamy and marriage, then present the findings of their study through explanation and charts. I found it to be an interesting read, especially with Ansari's comedic commentary sprinkled throughout.
Submitted ByAshley Kemp
Department or MajorLaw School
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailakemp@chapman.edu

The Lost Symbol

TitleThe Lost Symbol
AuthorDan Brown
Call NumberPS3552.R685434 L67 2009  
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewThis is another tale by Dan Brown about the Harvard Professor Robert Langdon and his adventures. This time, Langdon gets hoodwinked into a scary situation that threatens the life of his long time friend Peter Solomon. This complicated story involves freemasonry, symbolism, and one scary bad guy with his entire body tattooed. The book definitely had some plot twists and kept my interest. For those who like adventure stories, this is a good one.
Submitted ByJessica Bower
Department or MajorLibrary
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailjbower@chapman.edu

The American Spirit

TitleThe American Spirit
AuthorDavid McCullough
Call NumberMcNaughton
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewThis is an awe inspiring book on published speeches made throughout the country. He shares some of the stories our founding fathers went through and sacrificed  so we can do what we do today.
Submitted ByJames McCulloch
Department or MajorFacilities
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailmcculloc@chapman.edu

Me Talk Pretty One Day

TitleMe Talk Pretty One Day
AuthorSedaris, David
Call NumberPS3569.E314 M4 2000
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingSomewhat Recommended
Book ReviewIt had it's moments, but they were few and far between.  I know a lot of people like his writing, but I am not one of them.
Submitted ByRobin Pendergraft
Department or MajorSCST
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailpendergr@chapman.edu

All the Light We Cannot See

TitleAll the Light We Cannot See
AuthorDoerr, Anthony
Call NumberPS3604.O34 A77 2014  
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewI enjoyed this book, but not as much as I expected to.  I did appreciate the fact that it told about WWII but wasn't about fighting or violence and also the "literary qualities" were quite good.  In the end, the story was just a bit lacking.
Submitted ByRobin Pendergraft
Department or MajorSCST
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailpendergr@chapman.edu

Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?

TitleAre We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?
AuthorFrans De Waal
Call NumberMcNaughton
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewWonderful read. I really learned how important it is to think for your audience. I would highly recommend this book for animal and science lovers.
Submitted ByJoan Mountain
Department or MajorLaw Career Services
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailseguin@chapman.edu

Monday, June 19, 2017

The Archivist

TitleThe Archivist
AuthorMartha Cooley
Call NumberPS3553.O5646 A87 1998
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewCooley expertly weaves the stories of an archival librarian and his poet wife with that of TS Eliot and his wife, Vivienne. Mental illness, religion, betrayal, and loss lie at the center of this novel that examines how the past can have a hold on the present. Even better, snippets of Eliot's poetry shed light on the archivist's actions.
Submitted ByLugene Rosen
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emaillrosen@chapman.edu

Killing the Rising Sun

TitleKilling the Rising Sun
AuthorBill O'Reilly and Martin Gugard
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewFor anyone (like myself) with little knowledge of the lead up to the use of atomic weaponry on Japan during WWII, this is a great book to read.  The use of the bomb is still controversial, but I have an understanding of both sides now.
Submitted ByLinda Corcoran
Department or MajorAnderson Center
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailgreeley@chapman.edu

Bullseye

TitleBullseye
AuthorJames Patterson & Michael Ledwidge
Call NumberMcNaughton
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewAn assassin has been hired to kill POTUS. Standing in his way, and determined to stop him, are the Secret Service, FBI, and Detective Michael Bennett of the NYPD. Full of twists and turns, this is a typical Patterson novel, fast paced and easy to read.
Submitted ByCathy Elliott
Department or MajorLaw Library
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailbias@chapman.edu

Northanger Abbey

TitleNorthanger Abbey
AuthorJane Austen
Call NumberPR4034 .N7 2000  
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewI picked this up because it was the only novel of Jane Austen's I hadn't yet read, and found it was a fairly light satire of the gothic novels of the day, a deconstruction and reversal of the romantic tropes of the time, and at the same time, a defense of novels against those who dismissed them as "unworthy" reading material. The story centers of Catherine Morland, a fairly regular girl who gets invited to go on vacation in Bath, and follows her as peer pressure, deception, and her own overactive imagination almost get in the way of finding a husband. If you like Jane Austen, you'll probably like this one.
Submitted ByKristin Laughtin-Dunker
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emaillaughtin@chapman.edu

Wild

TitleWild
AuthorCheryl Strayed
Call NumberPS 3619 .T744 Z46 2013
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewWild is an intimate look at some of the most trying and compelling moments of Strayed's life conveyed through her mastering of the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT). Her matter-of-fact, tell it like it is approach to her struggles with addiction, promiscuity, abandonment, the death of her mother and the disintegration of her family makes the reader assimilate rather than adjudicate. We've all been there-unsure of our choices, wanting to break free from the ties that bind and the decisions that waylay. Throughout her journey, Strayed struggles with the weight of her pack, Monster, but even more so under the weight of her own complex emotions as she tries to rectify who she was with who she is becoming; all while navigating the path to self-enlightenment.
Submitted ByMeagan Maureen O'Shea
Department or MajorDodge College
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailoshea@chapman.edu

Three Dark Crowns

TitleThree Dark Crowns
AuthorKendare Blake
Call NumberMcNaughton
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingSomewhat Recommended
Book ReviewMagical matriarchal society that pits young royals against each other sound great, but this book feels like just a warm-up for the sequel. So much focus on world building and establishing character bonds. The young queens are weak and pretty much only preparing for the anticipated year long death match without ever truly demonstrating their ruthlessness or power. It's easy to get lost in the alphabet soup of names and places as different characters across the kingdom narrate every chapter. Bit too much romance between characters you don't truly care about. If you can get into lore then this is a fine read, but leaves a lot to be desired.
Submitted ByCallan Keeter
Department or MajorPolitical Science
StatusStudent
Chapman Emailkeete100@mail.chapman.edu

23 Things They Don't Tell You About Capitalism

Title23 Things They Don't Tell You About Capitalism
AuthorHa-Joon Chang
Call NumberHB501 .C523 2011
Location3rd Floor Business and Economics
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewLooking for an easy introduction into the various critiques of our current economic system? Then look no further then this book by Ha-Joon Chang. Chang is respected economist from South Korea and studies developing economies. This book, broken into 23 chapters, is an easy read written in layman's terms. The author even suggests different orders to read the chapters as to answer more specific questions. Overall this is a great book which touches on a lot of points people might be curious about regarding capitalism.
Submitted ByNick D'Andrea
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emaildandrea@chapman.edu

Surfing Newport Beach, The Glory days of Corona Del Mar

TitleSurfing Newport Beach, The Glory days of Corona Del Mar
AuthorClaudine and Paul Burnett
Call NumberGV839.65 .C2 B87 2013 c.2
Location2nd Floor Social Science Library
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewA great historical background of the coastal areas of Orange County. Also a very interesting and extensive history on the evolution of surfing and the surfboard.  
Submitted ByJames McCulloch
Department or MajorFacilities
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailmcculloc@chapman.edu

Hamilton: The Revolution

TitleHamilton: The Revolution
AuthorLin-Manuel Miranda and Jeremy McCarter
Call NumberML50.M6736 H3 2016
Location3rd Floor Music
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewA must-read for fans of the musical, co-written by its creator, this book contains not only the full libretto, but writings about its creation, writing, and the cast and creative team from its inception up until publication about a year after the play made its Broadway debut. It also offers deep insights into Miranda's influences and writing process, analyzing the musical's origins in not only American history but in contemporary hip-hop, as well as the musical's place in modern American culture. As a bonus, it has a ton of behind-the-scenes photos of the cast and staging of the original Broadway production.
Submitted ByKristin Laughtin-Dunker
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emaillaughtin@chapman.edu

Lucky

TitleLucky
AuthorGabrielle Bell
Call NumberPN6733.B45 L83 2006
Location1st Floor Graphic Novel
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewAn endearing graphic novel about the author's life in Brooklyn, New York.  Bell struggles with making money and maintaining her relationship, but she keeps her sense of humor throughout everything.  Anyone going through a quarter life crisis can relate to her story.  We're "Lucky" to have this gem!
Submitted ByTheresa Yanez
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailtyanez@chapman.edu

The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo

TitleThe Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo
AuthorAmy Schumer
Call NumberMcNaughton
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewThis compilation of essays by comedienne Amy Schumer is relatable and real. Schumer's feminism shines through and the reader can empathize with her journey. Those looking for laugh-out-loud moments akin to her stand-up may be left wanting, but her sense of humor is present throughout.
Submitted ByLauren Menges
Department or MajorLibrary
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailmenges@chapman.edu

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

World War Z

TitleWorld War Z
AuthorMax Brooks
Call NumberPS3602.R6445 W67 2013
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewOk, I know I've been reading this for like 2 months but I'm hoping it still counts :)  I finally finished!
Great read!  Slightly terrifying though because it's written as real life accounts of people before, during and after the Zombie Apocalypse.  I found it super interesting how different people from different parts of the world dealt with the war. It was also very, very realistic and makes you think. This is nothing like the movie I've been told (haven't seen the movie). We had a book club a couple of months ago and I really enjoyed chatting about this book. A truly great book for a book club and lots of discussion.
Submitted ByJami McCoy
Department or MajorAdvancement
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailjmccoy@chapman.edu

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

The Door

TitleThe Door
AuthorMagda Szabo
Call NumberPH 3351 .S592 A7413 2015
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewThis is not a book for everyone.  The two main characters, a novelist and her housekeeper, are not particularly likable, though both are bizarrely sympathetic.  The housekeeper, Emerence, is larger-than-life, and indeed, often feels like a fairy tale character, moving between a benevolent fairy godmother and a raging Rumplestiltskin.  These are things about the book that you'll either love or hate.  For me, they created a beautiful and terrible narrative, but they might not for everyone.
Submitted BySamantha Dressel
Department or MajorEnglish
StatusFaculty
Chapman Emailsdressel@chapman.edu

The Remains of the Day

TitleThe Remains of the Day
AuthorKazuo Ishiguro
Call NumberPR6059 .S5 R46 1990
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewThis book is a wry study in unreliable narrator.  The main character and narrator, a prim English butler, thinks back on his years of service with pride and contentment.  The reader finds herself questioning these findings.
Submitted BySamantha Dressel
Department or MajorEnglish
StatusFaculty
Chapman Emailsdressel@chapman.edu

The Theory of Light and Matter

TitleThe Theory of Light and Matter
AuthorAndrew Porter
Call NumberPS 3616 .O75 T47 2010
Location2nd Floor Humanities
RatingHighly Recommended
Book ReviewThe Theory of Light and Matter is a collection of ten, first person short fiction stories.  The subjects are relatable and I found myself becoming increasingly introspective on my own life experiences - from childhood to adulthood. The story that is also the book's namesake is my favorite, and not just because I work for a university. The best part about a book of short stories is that you feel like you've read multiple books in one sitting - and Andrew Porter's stories are no different. If you're haunted by nostalgia and wonder how the choices you make in life define who you are, this book is for you.
Submitted ByMeagan Maureen O'Shea
Department or MajorDodge College
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailoshea@chapman.edu

Chickadee

TitleChickadee
AuthorLouise Erdrich
Call NumberPS 3555 .R42 C45 2012
Location3rd Floor Muth
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewChickadee is book four of the Birchbark House series which focuses on an Ojibwe family's lives during the 1800s. Aimed at pre-teens, the book is nevertheless entertaining, suspenseful and educational. Recommended for a quick read.
Submitted ByCarolyn Radcliff
Department or MajorLeatherby Libraries
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailcradclif@chapman.edu

Monday, June 12, 2017

Rebel of the Sands

TitleRebel of the Sands
AuthorAlwyn Hamilton
Call NumberMcNaughton
Location1st Floor McNaughton
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewThis is a fun YA read that feels like a combination of the wild west and Arabian Nights. An orphan girl with an incredible shot takes off on an adventure across the desert with a handsome stranger, narrowly escaping enemy soldiers and deadly mythical beasts. Apparently this is the first installment of a series, and I am looking forward to reading the sequels.
Submitted ByAshley Kemp
Department or MajorLaw School
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailakemp@chapman.edu

Moonglow

TitleMoonglow
AuthorMichael Chabon
RatingRecommended
Book ReviewA brilliant author who makes you think.  I enjoyed the love story and depth of characters.  Not so interested in rocket science & engineering.  A memoir.
Submitted BySusan Sams
Department or MajorCGE
StatusStaff
Chapman Emailsams@chapman.edu